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Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

5 edition of Viruses, Evolution and Cancer found in the catalog.

Viruses, Evolution and Cancer

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Published by Academic Press Inc.,U.S. .
Written in English


Edition Notes

ContributionsEdouard Kurstak (Editor), Karl Maramorosch (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages813
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL9282454M
ISBN 100124297609
ISBN 109780124297609

Evidence indicates that the evolution of viruses is determined mainly by key features such as their small genomes, enormous population sizes, and short genera- tion times, and at least for RNA. Evolution of Viruses Although biologists have a significant amount of knowledge about how present-day viruses mutate and adapt, much less is known about how viruses originated in the first place. When exploring the evolutionary history of most organisms, scientists can look at fossil records and similar historic evidence.

“Viruses as Complex Adaptive Systems covers the evolution, diversity, and behavior of viruses from a mathematical perspective, providing a broad range of vignettes on the subject that are clear and engagingly written. The book also serves as a useful introduction to some aspects of theoretical biology.”—Oliver Pybus, University of Oxford. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Indeed, convergent evolution between divergent protein structures in viruses has previously been noted, and convergence is rampant in some other systems, with C 4 photosynthesis a notable case in point. Although the lack of a definitive phylogenetic tree of all viruses makes it impossible to conclusively rule out convergent evolution as an Cited by: the course of evolution in the parasite population. Finally, I consider different ways to study the evolution of antigenic variation. Experimental evolution of parasites under controlled condi-tions provides one way to study the relations between molecular rec-ognition, Cited by:


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Viruses, Evolution and Cancer Download PDF EPUB FB2

Viruses, Evolution and Cancer: Basic Considerations focuses on comparative biology and evolutionary aspects of DNA and RNA oncogenic viruses. Organized into seven parts, this book begins with a discussion on the host-cell-virus relationships.

Some chapters follow that discuss the comparative aspects of DNA and RNA oncogenic viruses. reports: She believed a virus may have been responsible for these symptoms, and through her research, she isolated the viruses that turned out to come from mice.

It looked like a virus, it smelled like a virus, a retrovirus, because those are the types of. Viruses of plants use various processes to make the huge quantity of hereditary diversity present in both among and inside the species.

Plant viruses may have processes of highly prone replication, which cause several mutations. By nature, it is quasi-species.

The evolution of plant viruses usually use the process of re-assortment and. Viruses can be pathogens, but their recognition as primarily causing diseases is wrong. This notion is based on the history of viruses in medicine, as explained in a book entitled “Viruses: More Friends Than Foes” (Moelling, ).

The scenario described here Evolution and Cancer book on viruses as drivers of by: 4. (, July 13). Viruses revealed to be a major driver of human evolution: Study tracking protein adaptation over millions of years yields insights relevant to fighting today's viruses.

Evolution and Cancer book evolution is a subfield of evolutionary biology and virology that is specifically concerned with the evolution of viruses. Evolution and Cancer book have short generation times, and many—in particular RNA viruses—have relatively high mutation rates (on the order of one point mutation or more per genome per round of replication).

This elevated mutation rate, when combined with natural selection, allows. Health professionals and those involved in infectious disease research will find Emerging Viruses startling: Harvard researcher Horowitz's studies gather evidence to conclude that AIDS and the Ebola viruses evolved during cancer virus experiments in which monkeys were Cited by: 4.

Ecology and Evolution of Cancer is a timely work outlining ideas that not only represent a substantial and original contribution to the fields of evolution, ecology, and cancer, but also goes beyond by connecting the interfaces of these disciplines.

This work engages the expertise of a multidisciplinary research team to collate and review the. Viruses hijack nearly every function of a host organism's cells in order to replicate and spread, so it makes sense that they would drive the evolution of the cellular machinery to a greater.

Viruses can be pathogens, but their recognition as primarily causing diseases is wrong. This notion is based on the history of viruses in medicine, as explained in a book entitled “Viruses: More Friends Than Foes” (Moelling, ). The scenario described here focuses on viruses as drivers of Cited by: 4.

viruses in host evolution as well as the role of host in virus evolution. This book also seeks to broadly consider and present the role of persistent viruses in evolution.

Although we have come to realize that viral persistence is indeed a common relationship between virus and host, it is usually considered as a variation of a host infectionFile Size: 1MB. This timely book addresses a wide range of current questions and research approaches at the forefront of the field and highlights recent advances in our understanding of the history and mechanisms of virus evolution.

Wherever possible authors have integrated information from the study of plant, animal and bacterial viruses. In a recent paper in Science, University of Utah geneticist Cedric Feschotte found that these viruses played a key role in the evolution of the mammalian immune system.

Cancer cells have characteristics that differ from normal cells. They all acquire the ability to grow uncontrollably. This can result from having control of their own growth signals, losing sensitivity to anti-growth signals, and losing the ability to undergo apoptosis or programmed cell death.

Cancer cells don't experience biological aging and maintain their ability to undergo cell division Author: Regina Bailey. The new disease making the rounds this winter sounds like a Steven Spielberg movie in the making: a common cold virus, which spreads via casual contact, mutates into a virulent form that hospitalizes and sometimes kills its victims.

Touted last month as the "killer cold," Adenovirus is far from fantasy, but neither is it scary enough to make a blockbuster. Accordingly, many terminologies have been frequently used in cancer literature, such as driver mutations, passenger mutations, neutral or positive selection, clonal expansion or sub-clonal heterogeneity, linear or branch evolution, stepwise or punctuated evolution, and gene mutations or CNVs or genome chaos.

While viruses -- the world's most abundant biological entities -- are not technically alive, they invade, replicate, and evolve within living cells. Michael Cordingley goes beyond our familiarity with infections to show how viruses spur evolutionary change in their hosts and shape global ecosystems, from ocean photosynthesis to drug-resistant bacteria.

Virus evolution and genetic variation. Drug-resistant HIV. Reassortment of flu viruses. If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website. If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains * and * are unblocked.

Beyond causing disease, they contribute to the continued evolution of Homo sapiens, defining, in a sense, our very nature as a distinctive species. To appreciate the influence that viruses have had on human evolution, it is helpful to review the historical context of.

Viruses, evolution, and cancer. New York, Academic Press, (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Edouard Kurstak; Karl Maramorosch.

Find more information about: ISBN: evolution, and cancer: basic considerations\/span>\n \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0. Viruses, Evolution and Cancer: Basic Considerations focuses on comparative biology and evolutionary aspects of DNA and RNA oncogenic viruses.

Organized into seven parts, this book begins with a discussion on the host-cell-virus relationships. Some chapters follow that discuss the comparative aspects of DNA and RNA oncogenic Edition: 1.The Human Genome Is Full of Viruses. in our long-term evolution. In many ways, viruses are eerily reminiscent of the idea of ancient spells, which sit quietly as words in a book until someone.Viruses have an incredible capacity to adapt to environmental challenges, but sometimes, the environment constraints viral adaptation.

Turner’s laboratory uses experimental evolution to study how viruses adapt to environmental changes (e.g. temperature changes), and the mechanisms by which viruses jump to novel host species.